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12 Jul 2019

Interview: In Conversation with ThisReo

This week, we spoke to creative director @thisreo to chat about their artistic evolution, the future of fashion and technology, and the pros and cons of social media. Read more:

A few months ago, you shared a post that helped you come across a now signature style of yours. What was the artistic and technical process like?

The post you’re referring to changed the direction of my work in so many ways. Before that piece, I was making a lot colorful digital abstract expressionist pieces. People liked it but it wasn’t getting me any extra work. I was reading a lot on social media at the time on what generated response, and it was mostly about people connecting to other humans. The posts that performed best featured a face or a body. I looked at my feed at the time and it had none of that. I had a few pictures from an artist I connected with and just started experimenting with putting her in front of the colorful abstract prices I was making. When I posted it I finally got the response I was hoping for.

As a creative director, how have you seen fashion and technology grow alongside one another? Any notable breakthroughs in the past few years?

For as long as I can remember I’ve wanted to put a gif on a shirt. For years people have been trying to make it happen but it’s just not the norm yet. I felt like I was always standing at that intersection waiting for technology and fashion to meet. Then I started seeing 3D printed clothing/shoes and almost sculptural work like Iris Van Harpen and I was blown away because that’s obviously way more complicated than a gif on a shirt! 

I recently saw an article about fully 3D generated clothing for photo shoots being more of a trend and it made me think fashion and tech are almost merging into the same thing. When AR is the norm we just might be downloading the newest pair of Nike shoes and “wearing” them instantly. You’d be able to see a shirt someone’s wearing, buy it and instantly be wearing it before you even walk past them. Exciting (scary) times for sure!

Do you find social media to be more beneficial or limiting in your work? Why?

I believe it has been both for me…on one hand, social media is where 90 percent of the brand work I’ve done for Dior, Nike, Adidas, Sprite has come from. It usually begins with someone from a creative team or agency reaching out to me through a DM and going from there. I’m incredibly grateful for the ability to connect with an otherwise difficult to reach company through social media. On the other hand, it’s also where I’ve been copied the most. I’ve had my work put on mood boards for when brands want my style but hire someone else (cheaper) to execute. It used to bother me a lot until I recognized that it’s all a part of being vulnerable and showing your work to the world. 

Where do you typically draw inspiration from? Online? Or IRL? 

I get my inspiration from so many places. Traveling, movies, music, nature, psychedelics, love, sex, great conversations, food, museums, architecture and of course, the internet.

Is there a particular artist who inspires you, or whose work you’re excited about?

I am constantly inspired by artists like 

Jean Paul Goude 

Joanie Lemercier 

James Turrell 

Beeple 

Flying Lotus 

David Fincher 

Zach Lieberman 

Flume 

Nick Knight 

Solve sundsbo

Mathew Williams